Use of Urgent Care Growing in Southern California – you really need to read this post!!!

LOS ANGELES – Having matured from their early 1970s image of “Docs in a Box,” urgent care centers are growing in popularity with patients who would rather not wait to see a doctor — whether in an office or in the emergency department (ED).

Urgent care’s growth is partly attributable to immediate and projected shortages of primary care physicians. California barely meets the nationally recognized standard for the number of primary care physicians. According to a July 2010 California HealthCare Foundation report, only the Orange, Sacramento, and Bay Area regions meet the recommended supply. Los Angeles falls just below. Pretty scary – huh??

Long waits in hospital EDs also are a factor in urgent care’s growth. The Hospital Association of Southern California reports that the average wait time for non-emergency care at a Los Angeles County hospital without a fast-track triage system is seven hours.

Only 29% of primary care doctors have after-hours coverage, according to the American Academy of Urgent Care Medicine. Most urgent care centers are open from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. and see patients usually within 30 minutes, according to industry literature.

AAUCM reports that approximately 8,700 walk-in, stand-alone urgent care centers exist in the U.S. compared with about 4,600 hospital EDs. AAUCM and the Urgent Care Association of America, a trade group, estimate that 400 to 800 new urgent care clinics open each year across the country.

Most urgent care centers accept insurance and all accept cash, according to Lou Ellen Horwitz, executive director of the trade group. The treatment cost is usually comparable to a primary care visit, and less expensive than the ED, according to urgent care organizations. Charges vary according to insurance coverage, and patients are urged to learn about payment options before visiting.

‘A Market in Great Need of Access to Care’

With conditions in Southern California ripe for improved access, urgent care providers have taken notice. Centers in Los Angeles and Orange counties operate under several business models, ranging from independent to hospital-affiliated. Charges range from $80 to $130 for a “basic” visit; additional diagnostics can cost more, and some centers offer enhanced “tiers” of service.

Doctor’s Express, which bills itself as the nation’s first urgent care medical franchise, plans to open a clinic soon in Santa Clarita in Los Angeles County.

“It’s a market in great need of access to care,” according to Scott Burger, Doctor’s Express co-founder and chief medical officer.

“Southern California is no stranger to urgent care, with many successful clinics,” said Doctor’s Express franchise owner Paul Arvanitis.

Concentra, the nation’s largest urgent care provider, continues to see an increase at all of its centers, including those in Southern California. It operates four centers in Los Angeles.

PLEASE DON’T LEAVE HERE WITHOUT READING THE ‘COMPLETE ARTICLE’
PHB has personal experience saving money $$ and time by using URGENT CARE instead of the ED. Have a great weekend and stay safe everyone! 🙂 Please leave me a comment or two about what you thought of today’s post.

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